#FERGUSON ATOP KEYSTONE XL PIPELINE: #MIKEBROWN

“Nothing is more difficult, and therefore more precious, than to be able to decide.”
― Napoleon

As for the “aye” votes, they received just $212,824 from environmental interests, or, on average, just $887 across the entire two years of the 2012 election cycle. Obviously there are partisan reasons behind the way the votes broke down, but an analysis of donations to the 19 Democrats who crossed party lines shows they also received jim decicco from the oil and gas industry and were shunned by environmental donors. Supporters of the bill included 221 Republicans, who took an average of $59,198 from the oil and gas industry, and 19 Democrats, who took an average of $32,089. Those 19 Democrats, on average, only collected $2,335 from environmental donors, compared to the $7,575 received by their Democratic colleagues who voted the other way.   MORE

You love kill Kids brains

“If a free society cannot help the many who are poor, it cannot save the few who are rich.

[Inaugural Address, January 20 1961]”
― John F. Kennedy

“If a law is unjust, a man is not only right to disobey it, he is obligated to do so.”

Jefferson’s statement in the Declaration of Independence, “…whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government…,”

Martin Luther King, Jr.’ “One has not only a legal but a moral responsibility to obey just laws. Conversely, one has a moral responsibility to disobey unjust laws.”

Michael Brown

Michael Brown Cerberus Management Group

Unless you become more watchful in your states and check the spirit of monopoly and thirst for exclusive privileges you will in the end find that… the control over your dearest interests has passed into the hands of these corporations.
Andrew Jackson

 

Ferguson Land grab

Multinational corporations do control. They control the politicians. They control the media. They control the pattern of consumption, entertainment, thinking. They’re destroying the planet and laying the foundation for violent outbursts and racial division.
Jerry Brown

 

Asset forfeiture by cop

Asset forfeiture by cop

Many of the benefits from keeping terrorism fear levels high are obvious. Private corporations suck up massive amounts of Homeland Security cash as long as that fear persists, while government officials in the National Security and Surveillance State can claim unlimited powers and operate with unlimited secrecy and no accountability.
Glenn Greenwald

Pipeline-Map

The only difference between the Republican and Democratic parties is the velocities with which their knees hit the floor when corporations knock on their door. That’s the only difference.
Ralph Nader

 

Abortion by Cop

Abortion by Cop

I think the people should have a right to boycott whoever they want to boycott without the government making them into criminals and try to protect corporations from people. They should protect people from corporations.
Ziggy Marley

 

keystone-pipeline-map-kwd2

Smart people make good choices. They dig science and say ‘no’ to the invasion of sovereign nations for the pleasure of corporations.
Henry Rollins

 

 

Iraq War on Kids

Iraq War on Kids

As a source of innovation, an engine of our economy, and a forum for our political discourse, the Internet can only work if it’s a truly level playing field. Small businesses should have the same ability to reach customers as powerful corporations. A blogger should have the same ability to find an audience as a media conglomerate.
Al Franken

 

It would exempt all modifications to existing cross-border pipelines, even major expansions, from federal review. The bill also allows for unlimited exports of liquefied natural gas to anywhere in the world as long as the LNG passes through Canada or Mexico.

It passed 238 to 173.

221 Republicans and 17 Democrats voted for it. 172 Democrats and 1 Republican voted against it. The sole Republican was Walter Jones (NC-03).

Here are the 17 Democrats:

John Barrow (GA-12)
Sanford Bishop (GA-02)
Jim Costa (CA-16)
Henry Cuellar (TX-28)
William Enyart (IL-12)
Pete Gallego (TX-23)
Al Green (TX-09)
Gene Green (TX-29)
Ruben Hinojosa (TX-15)
Sean Matheson (UT-04)
Mike McIntyre (NC-07)
Patrick Murphy (FL-18)
William Owens (NY-21)
Colin Peterson (MN-07)
Nick Rahall (WV-03)
Kurt Schrader (OR-05)
Filemon Vela (TX-34)

Last year, 19 Democrats voted for a bill designed to expedite the Keystone XL approval process.

Five Democrats who voted for the bill last year voted against the one today:

Cheri Bustos (IL-17)
Jim Cooper (TN-05)
Sean Maloney (NY-12)
Terri Sewell (AL-07)
John Yarmuth (KY-03)

And three Democrats who voted against the bill last year voted for the one today:

Pete Gallego (TX-23)
Nick Rahall (WV-03)
Kurt Schrader (OR-05)

MORE  For Which 17 Democrats Voted to Weaken Regulations on Oil and Gas Pipelines?E
TUE JUN 24, 2014 AT 06:57 PM PDT

A social contract is the way out of this dilemma for corporations that want to lead in the 21st century by showing consumers how seriously they take customer loyalty and goodwill.
Simon Mainwaring

 

 

RED STATE Prison Industry

Prisoner (Inmate) Gerrymandering for congressional seat

THE

POWER

The reason the compromise was written into the Constitution was to incentivize the South to adopt the Constitution. Because population drives the number of congressional representatives and the tax apportionment, slave states wanted their slaves counted as part of the population.

The reason the compromise was written into the Constitution was to incentivize the South to adopt the Constitution. Because population drives the number of congressional representatives and the tax apportionment, slave states wanted their slaves counted as part of the population.

“There are many ways to hijack political power. One of them is to draw state or city legislative districts around large prisons — and pretend that the inmates are legitimate constituents.”—Brent Staples

The reason the compromise was written into the Constitution was to incentivize the South to adopt the Constitution. Because population drives the number of congressional representatives and the tax apportionment, slave states wanted their slaves counted as part of the population.

The reason the compromise was written into the Constitution was to incentivize the South to adopt the Constitution. Because population drives the number of congressional representatives and the tax apportionment, slave states wanted their slaves counted as part of the population.

Resolutions against prison-based gerrymandering | Prison Gerrymandering Project 

When the usual residence rule is applied to prisoners, it may dilute the strength of urban voters in favor of rural ones.

5 As is the case with resident aliens, prisoners (in all but two states) cannot vote.

6 “[P]risons are disproportionately built in rural areas but most incarcerated people call urban areas home,” so counting prisoners where they usually reside leads to “a systematic transfer of population and political clout from urban to rural areas.”

7 Because they rely on the data the Census provides, most states have counted prisoners where they are incarcerated. However, Delaware, Maryland, and New York have recently passed laws to count prisoners in their home districts, and other states have eliminated local “prison-based gerrymandering.”

8 Moreover, the Census Bureau for the first time has released Advance Group Quarters data that makes available the number of prisoners in each census block, facilitating state and local government efforts to remove prisoners from their calculations when redistricting should they choose to do so.

9 This led Nathaniel Persily to ask if a jurisdiction would not violate Section 2 of the Voting Rights Act (“VRA”) for failing to subtract prisoners “[n]ow that the Bureau is making it easier for states to do so;” but he also acknowledges that reallocating prisoners to their home

Red-Staes-Have-enough-prison-Labor

Red State Prison Industry

communities for purposes of districting may have the “perverse effect” of counting them where they may not have lived for years and may never return.10

II. WHERE SHOULD THE CENSUS COUNT PRISONERS Where people are counted matters a great deal in terms of voting strength and the distribution of representation. Most people probably intuitively object to counting a large, concentrated population—the members of which have no voting rights and no control over where they live—as residents of the prisoner-hosting communities and then drawing districts accordingly. Moreover, the Prison Policy Initiative (“PPI”) found that the rule’s application to prisoners “leads to a dramatic distortion of representation at local and state levels, and creates an inaccurate picture of community populations for research and planning purposes.”11 Despite those problems, the usual residence rule remains the norm; but because of them, the usual residence rule is most controversial when applied to incarcerated populations.12 To eliminate its deleterious and controversial effects, the Census Bureau should make another exception to the usual residence rule to count prisoners in their home communities.SamplesResolution prepared for Massachusetts calling on the Census Bureau to change where it counts people in prison
Resolution prepared for an urban county in California calling on the state to eliminate prison-based gerrymandering
Resolution prepared for Jackson Mississippi calling on the state to eliminate prison-based gerrymandering
Although technically not a resolution, Essex County Local Law Number 1 of 2003 offers a detailed declaration of why a rural county would not want to consider prison populations a part of their community or their electoral system.Prison-Based Gerrymandering

The total number of European immigrants to all 13 colonies before 1775 was about 500,000; of these 55,000 were involuntary prisoners. (A separate 300,000 were enslaved Africans.) Of the 450,000 or so European arrivals who came voluntarily, Tomlins estimates that 48% were indentured.[3] About 75% were under the age of 25. The age of adulthood for men was 24 years (not 21); those over 24 generally came on contracts lasting about 3 years.[4] Regarding the children who came, Gary Nash reports that, “many of the servants were actually nephews, nieces, cousins and children of friends of emigrating Englishmen, who paid their passage in return for their labor once in America.”[5]

Over the last several decades, the percentage of Americans incarcerated in prisons has increased four-fold. Incarcerated persons are often held in areas that are geographically and demographically far removed from their home communities. For instance, although non-metropolitan counties contain only 20% of the national population, they host 60% of new prisons.