#KOCH is Black–#HEMP is Green

               I am telling you, why Americans over the age of 65, by contrast, oppose legalizing weed, 59 percent to 38 percent.

Anything Koch Produces out Chemicals is not sustainable but deadly.  Hemp is sustainable plant that grows like a weed; also, stronger than chemicals Koch produces, the junk in world’s garbage.

          Don’t fall for the lie. We are in this together and together we can fix this. We are limited only by our imaginations, which are vast. The first thing that  used to fight the original people was to ban mercantilism; taking away the peoples ability to be legitimate by banning hemp farming. Hemp was refined into sustainable and clean products such as hemp seed foods, hemp oil, beauty medicinal  supplements, wax, resin, rope, cloth, pulp, paper, plastics, trash bags, Steel, rubber and fuel.
As told by African Slavers: Hemp and the African
7 The African Dagga Cultures
          Long before greed and ambition prompted the countries of Western Europe to send their armies to conquer the New World, Europeans were exploring and exploiting Africa.
         The incentives that beckoned the white race to the “dark continent” were many, but chief among them were precious goods such as gold, ivory, and spices. Once they began to colonize the New World, however, European interest focused on yet another African treasure—the slave.
          The growth of the plantation systems in both North and South America had created a sudden demand for cheap and obedient labor, and to meet this demand Europeans, again, looked to Africa.
          Africa was no stranger to the slave trade. Human bondage is one of man’s earliest atrocities. It was commonplace throughout the ancient and early medieval worlds. But until the coming of the Europeans, slav-ery had existed on only a relatively small scale.
          Once the people of Western Europe “discovered” the continent, however, slavery became big business. Approximately ten million native Africans were taken from their homes between the middle of the fifteenth to the end of the nineteenth century to destinations sometimes halfway around the world, to be dis-passionately sold like chattel.

Frustrated at not being able to buy cattle from these natives at a reasonable price, the Dutch immigrants brought their own cattle to the Cape Colony, along with farmers (Boers) to look after them. The coming of the Boers, it turned out, signaled the en-slavement of the Hottentots.

At first, the Dutch and the African got on fairly well together. But as more and more Boers came to the Cape Colony, more and more of the Hottentots’ land was expropriated, including their valuable grazing fields. The Boers were not merely content with robbing the Hottentots of their land, they also began raiding their herds.

The Hottentots offered only a token resistance. They were herders, not warriors; and their spears were no match for gunpowder. To preserve their precious cattle, many of the Hottentots moved further north into the interior. Those who tried to make a fight of it were either killed or taken prisoner and made to serve as domestic servants for the rest of their lives.

Despite his disapproval of the drug, Thompson says that the white landowners cultivated cannabis for their servants, even though its effects were not in the best interests of the whites. The reason for this anomaly, explains Thompson, was that the white man used dagga “as an inducement to retain the wild Bushmen in their service. whom they have made captives at an early age . “11

There were some whites such as evangelist Hugo Hahn who shared Thompson’s belief that continued use of dagga was not in the best interests of the natives. Hahn had come to Africa to save the souls of the savages.

Their use of dagga, Flahn felt, was a vile habit that would keep their souls from ever entering heaven. Not one to sit idly by while souls were at stake, Hahn raided Boer hemp farms, burning the wicked plants wherever he found them. His actions did little to endear him to either the natives or the white settlers of the area.12

Although he could not have cared less about the souls of the na-tives, another crusader who condemned the natives’ indulgence in dagga was the famous American journalist Henry M. Stanley, whose rendezvous with the English missionary, David Livingston in 1871 is immortalized in his terse greeting: “Mr. Livingston, I presume.”

Unlike the compassionate Livingston, Stanley had little regard for the African native whom he described as “wild as a colt, chafing, rest-less, ferociously impulsive, superstitiously timid, liable to furious dem-onstrations, suspicious and unreasonable. . .”13

Stanley was in fact totally prejudiced against the native African. Regarding the natives’ use of cannabis, which he believed weakened their bodies and made them unfit to carry his cumbrous cargo, he wrote:

Certainly most deleterious to the physical powers is the almost universal habit of vehemently inhaling the smoke of the Cannabis sativa or wild hemp. In a light atmosphere, such as we have in hot days in the Tropics, with the thermometer rising to 140 Fahr. in the sun, these people, with lungs and vitals injured by excessive indulgence in these destructive habits, discover they have no physical stamina to sustain them. The rigor of a march in a loaded caravan soon tells upon their weakened powers, and one by one they drop from the ranks, betraying their impotence and infirmaties.14

Apparently, the unwillingness of the natives to risk their lives and to break their backs so that Stanley could become famous was not due to dagga’s weakening of their spirits.

The change in attitude occurred shortly after 1843, when the Republic of Natalia (Natal), on the northeast coast of South Africa, was annexed by England and made a part of the Cape Colony. Following the development of the sugar industry in the new province, more and more laborers were needed to work the fields. When native manpower proved unequal to the task, workers were sought from other countries, especially from the British colony of India, and about 6000 mainly low-caste Indians entered the country.26

Although brought over expressly to work in the sugar fields, these “coolies,” as they were called, left the fields as soon as they were able to satisfy their indenture obligations and they sought jobs in other indus-tries. Many became semi-skilled laborers, domestic servants, farmers, storekeepers, fishermen, etc. But while they fitted into the European way of life, they never became a part of it. Their dark skins, culture, social and religious background, and language set them apart from both the Europeans and the native Africans.

         Europeans were also suspicious of them because of their use of cannabis, a habit which they brought with them from India. Cannabis, the Europeans believed, made the “coolies” sick and lazy and therefore unable to work, and also led them to commit criminal acts.
         The Indian emigrées had not had to import cannabis seeds with them; cannabis was already a popular among the natives and it was probably from them that the Indians obtained their cannabis. It was not long, however, before legal steps were adopted to curtail such usage.
         By 1870, European settlers became so alarmed at the alleged dangers of cannabis to South Africa that they passed a law “prohibiting the smoking use, or possession by the sale, barter, or gift to, any coolies what-soever, of any portion of the hemp plant (Cannabis sativa). .”27
         But just as identical laws in other countries had no effect on the use of cannabis, so too was it ignored in Africa. In 1887, the Wragg Commission (named after its chairman, Supreme Court Judge Walter Wragg) concluded that the “coolies” were still using cannabis and that the drug posed a danger to white South Africans. Again, measures were taken to outlaw the sale, cultivation, possession, and use of cannabis. Such laws were no more successful than previous ones.
          In 1923, South Africa tried to enlist the aid of the League of Nations in outlawing cannabis on an international scale, but to no avail. Five years later, the country passed yet another anti-cannabis law. This was followed by still more anti-cannabis laws.
          The result was always the same–try though they might to legislate cannabis out of existence, South African lawmakers were never a match for the plant’s tenacious hold over its devotees.
          The safflower and henna supplied the women with dyes for the stuffs which they manufactured from hemp and flax.
Advertisements

Legalization of Smokeless Hemp for Bio-Fuels called for by 18 Members of Congress

XTRM Cannabis Ventures a wholly owned subsidiary of Extreme Biodiesel has opened escrow on a 40 acre parcel in California with plans to cultivate Hemp and Marijuana as well as the construction of a massive indoor grow facility.

Image

XTRM Cannabis Ventures plans to develop the 40 acres to accommodate up to five 20,000 sqft warehouses for indoor marijuana / cannabis growth, 20 acres for outdoor Hemp cultivation for biodiesel, and an industrial center to process marijuana / cannabis into smokeless products.

Image

http://www.hempworld.com/hemp-cyberfarm_com/htms/countries/usa/usahstates.html

Hemp Cultivation in USA State by State

 

Other Relevant Links

Letter from Congress to Obama

http://blumenauer.house.gov/images/stories/2014/02-12-14%20Blumenauer%20Rescheduling%20Letter.pdf

Legalization of Hemp

http://www.marketwatch.com/story/victory-for-hemp-farmers-as-us-house-of-representatives-legalizes-the-cultivation-of-hemp-2014-02-03?reflink=MW_news_stmp

XTRM Cannabis Ventures Disclaimer

The Company would like to assure all investors that in all cannabis related actions the Company is conferring with counsel to be sure any business activities are deemed legal. XTRM advises all investors to see the website being developed at http://xtrmcannabisventures.com

 

Investor Relations Contact

info@extremebiodiesel.com

Republican Leaders Manipulate the Vote To Poison Me= Not a fan

The Chernobyl Nuclear Plant Reactor 4 in the Ukraine caused severe radioactive contamination in April 1986. Industrial Hemp has been used to remove contaminants from the soils, called phytoremediation.
OVEC linked to this editorial from the normally pro-coal Morgantown Dominion Post that says: water — a necessity so fundamental it’s one that people in a developed country should expect. At the time of the spill, Governor Earl Ray Tomblin, a Democrat, issued a strict do-not-use order for tap water, which lasted in some areas for 10 days.
Businesses shuttered, schools closed, people mobbed grocery stores only to find empty water shelves. “The problem is the Jan. 9 chemical spill and the resultant publicity was no isolated instance. Chemical spills, sludge and slurry dams leaks and breaks, fracking fallout, acid mine drainage, mountaintop removal mines and any one of a dozen other such environmental hazards are virtually the norm in West Virginia. … until we get serious about enforcing regulations and hiring enough inspectors, and empowering them to do their job, it will happen again.”
A fifth-generation native of the Appalachian Kanawha River region (known as Chemical Valley), Satterfield has always used the water for everything. But even with the official go-ahead having been given several weeks ago, she refuses to drink it. Nor will she brush her teeth with it or shower in it; she won’t run a load of laundry. She even refuses to mop the floor with the water. “It’s sad,” she says, her eyes tired. “All my life, with all the chemical plants, Carbide, DuPont and all the rest, we’ve never had a problem like this.” It’s long past time to get serious.
On January 9, a storage tank holding 48,000-gal. of the coal-washing chemical MCHM ruptured right next to the Elk River. Feb. 11, 108,000-gal. of coal slurry spilled from a Patriot Coal processing facility into the Kanawha River. On Feb. 2, a pipe under a coal ash pond ruptured, sending 82,000 tons of coal ash and 27 million gallons of tainted water into the Dan River. Coal slurry is nasty stuff. It contains mercury, arsenic, chromium, manganese, boron, and other heavy metals.right next to the Elk River, less than two miles from the intake to the water treatment plant for Charleston, W.Va. Approximately 10,000-gal. of the chemical spilled into the river. The water supply for 300,000 people was put out of commission for everything except flushing toilets.
Image

OHIO RIVER 1% of surface water is drinkable

A little more than a month later, oOn Feb. 11, 108,000-gal. of coal slurry spilled from a Patriot Coal processing facility into the Kanawha River, reported the Charleston Gazette on wvgazette.com. As the coal slurry was being pumped a valve failed. Next the alarm that was supposed to alert operators of the valve failure itself failed. The coal slurry soon overwhelmed the containment wall until the slurry flowed into Fields Creek, which flows into the Kanawha River.
Image

Why Poison Water?

Coal slurry is nasty stuff. It contains mercury, arsenic, chromium, manganese, boron, and other heavy metals.
On Feb. 2, a pipe under a coal ash pond owned by Duke Energy ruptured, sending 82,000 tons of coal ash and 27 million gallons of tainted water into the Dan River, upstream from Danville, Va.
Image

Do all Americans want Health Care Clean Water and Equal Pay