Prison Industry Market

for joy reid report on prison labor cost of middle class jobsVietnam Protest Video- Eve of DestructionAccording to the Left Business Observer, the federal prison industry produces 100% of all military helmets, ammunition belts, bullet-proof vests, ID tags, shirts, pants, tents, bags, and canteens. Along with war supplies, prison workers supply 98% of the entire market for equipment assembly services; 93% of paints and paintbrushes; 92% of stove assembly; 46% of body armor; 36% of home appliances; 30% of headphones/microphones/speakers; and 21% of office furniture. Airplane parts, medical supplies, and much more: prisoners are even raising seeing-eye dogs for blind people.

In March, Coke installed five special phone booths in Dubai labor camps that accepted Coca-Cola bottle caps instead of coins. In exchange for the cap from a bottle of Coke—which costs about fifty-four cents—migrant workers could make a three-minute international call. The ad shows laborers in hard hats and reflective vests lining up to use the machine—and grinning, for the first time in the video, as they wait. “I’ve saved one more cap, so I can talk to my wife again tomorrow,” one man tells the camera. More than forty thousand people made calls using the machines. Then, in April, after the booths had been up for about a month, the company dismantled them.

Boycott-COKE-OR-Pepsi-Politics--Mandela-Boycott--COKE--#choosePEPSI-2 2

Hemp Farmershemp-uses

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COPS Office ADL Resources:Homeland Security Budget- FOR Boehner Netanyahu

"The Old Flag Never Touched the Ground"

#MyBrothersKeeper #HANDSUPDONTSHOOT #FOR #MIKEBROWN #ERICGARNER #GLOBALGENERATIONZ NO HITTING; NO NAME CALLING;Algebra Works

From the DEA to “Homeland Security”

In a country less than 13 percent black, one half of the prison population is African … 1/2 Immigrants

1/2 Total Veterans

Immediately following the civil war, Black Codes created a list of crimes punishable only when committed by black people. Mississippi made it a crime for African Americans to be unemployed or drunk, or to have run away, neglected children, or handled money carelessly. The convict lease system farmed black and a few white

prisoners out to work in factories, mines, and fields that built the New South. Through a gaping loophole in the 13th Amendment, politicians replaced slavery with a penal system designed to control black labor.

Mississippi Black Code
Adapted from a document placed online by Jud Sage at Northern Virginia Community College

following the civil war, Black Codes created a list of crimes punishable only let american farmers grow hemp green&brownHemp Farmershemp infographicbefore after hemp artsayings Quotation-Voltaire-man-history-Meetville-Quotes-45861Cows  Love Hemp 2_seeds_of fear death 2Quotes Prohibition copyRep. Gene Alday (R-Wells)"The Old Flag Never Touched the Ground"headerCOPS HOMELAND SECURITY#HandsUpDontShoot

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“Retaliation Against Minority Employees”

As the end of 2002 approached, in the wake of elections giving Republicans control of the White House and Congress, the Senate and House took quick action to approve expansive legislation creating the Department of Homeland Security. President Bush signed the measure into law in late November 2002.

On Their Image As A Couple

We are new to politics in terms of just this approach–how we talk, how we look–imagine having a president of the United States who is just two years out of college dept and understands that.

COPS Office ADL Resources:Homeland Security Budget- FOR Boehner Netanyahu.

“Community policing is based, in part, on law enforcement officers understanding the cultural norms and needs of the specific communities they protect, and serving the citizens of those communities in an unbiased manner,” Carl R. Peed, Director of COPS, said in announcing the grant. “This program reinforces those professional values, and can be of great benefit to law enforcement agencies.”

ALEC ADL St. Louis Missouri Ferguson Mike Brown ; ALEC South African Police Service Mpumalanga Rustenburg Julius Malema

#HandsUpDontShoot: Corporate Agriculture’s “Right to Farm”
Through ALEC, Global Corporations Are Scheming to Rewrite YOUR Rights and Boost THEIR Revenue
Through the corporate-funded

American Legislative Exchange Council, (ALEC) global corporations and state politicians vote behind closed doors to try to rewrite state laws that govern your rights. These so-called “model bills” reach into almost every area of American life and often directly benefit huge corporations.
In ALEC’s own words, corporations have “a VOICE and a VOTE” on specific changes to the law that are then proposed in your state.

DO YOU?Julius Malema

Mines-Marikana Rustenburg, South Africa

see it on TV and think it will never happen to you_Julius Malema

ALEC South African Police Service -Sheriff’s Badge-Israel

Finding the Sheriff's Badge

Finding the Sheriff’s Badge

Mineworkers take part in a march on Monday at Lonmin's Marikana mine, in South Africa's North West Province. Reuters

Mineworkers take part in a march on Monday at Lonmin’s Marikana mine, in South Africa’s North West Province. Reuters

Risk: South Africa's gold mines are the deepest in the world; ranked as worth its weight?

Risk: South Africa’s gold mines are the deepest in the world; ranked as worth its weight?

Demonstrators raise their hands and chant "hands up, don't shoot" during a protest over the killing of Michael Brown on Aug. 12 in Clayton, Mo.

Demonstrators raise their hands and chant “hands up, don’t shoot” during a protest over the killing of Michael Brown on Aug. 12 in Clayton, Mo.

The creation of international financial institutions which gave terms that did not benefit African people but the multinational companies that came to exploit the resources of Africa. So why listen to people who have no history of helping you anywhere else in Africa, except to milk your resources. Hands Up Monsanto Dont shootST LOUIS FERGUSON THE REAL Battle Missourians Fight ALEC Over Big Agriculture’s “Right to Farm”  #UniteBlue @UNITEblue

Monsanto
MO Voters Add ALEC’s Right-To-Farm Act to State Bill of Rights

ALEC’s Right To Farm Act
Missourians Fight ALEC Over Big Agriculture’s “Right to Farm”

Grassroots efforts will likely push a recount on an amendment to Missouri’s bill of rights that favors the interests of corporate agriculture

ALEC ALEC, For-Profit Criminal Justice, and Wisconsin

Alumni Scott Walker and For-Profit Prisons

gold, platinum, manganese

#CharlieHebdo Dieudonné M'bala #MikeBrown  Africa French Belgium 2

French Intervention in Africa Land Grab Hate Speech for resources Free Labour #CharlieHebdo Dieudonné M’bala #MikeBrown Africa French Belgium CORP COPS

The Zimbabweans, in the next 10 years are going to be the only Africans who own their own land.Who Controls Israel

Apartheid Israeli

Apartheid Segregation Occupation Gaza India

Apartheid Israel

Apartheid

Israeli officials acknowledged that the motives were not entirely altruistic. Jewish settlers have raised objections to Palestinians being on board buses that enter their communities, fearing attacks. West Bank settlers last year petitioned the army to sign an order banning Palestinians from riding buses servicing West Bank settlers.

He said settlers often complain when Palestinians enter their buses. Palestinians can be blocked from boarding, kicked off or subject to verbal abuse once on board, he said. ‘Riding with settlers is humiliating, and involves a lot of suffering,’ Hamdan said.

In one instance, Hamdan said a female Jewish settler tried to order him off a bus that had come from the large Israeli settlement of Ariel but the bus driver refused to stop. He said his friends have had to walk 10 kilometres, or six miles, after being kicked off Israeli buses.

‘The new bus line is better, because we won’t have to go through all of this,’ he said, adding that the buses were a cheaper alternative to the private minivans that shuttle Palestinians to work inside Israel. A bus ticket costs anywhere from US$1 to US$3, compared to US$6 demanded by the private drivers.

Hosni Hanash, a 45-year-old construction worker from the village of Zeita, said he generally sets out from his village at 03h45 each morning, arrives in a taxi at the Eyal checkpoint at 04h30, and then spends an hour crossing through Eyal before heading in a private van to a full day of construction work.

He said the separation that began Monday relieved some of the stress of the long morning journey. ‘We are comfortable being by ourselves,’ he said.

#KOCH is Black–#HEMP is Green

               I am telling you, why Americans over the age of 65, by contrast, oppose legalizing weed, 59 percent to 38 percent.

Anything Koch Produces out Chemicals is not sustainable but deadly.  Hemp is sustainable plant that grows like a weed; also, stronger than chemicals Koch produces, the junk in world’s garbage.

          Don’t fall for the lie. We are in this together and together we can fix this. We are limited only by our imaginations, which are vast. The first thing that  used to fight the original people was to ban mercantilism; taking away the peoples ability to be legitimate by banning hemp farming. Hemp was refined into sustainable and clean products such as hemp seed foods, hemp oil, beauty medicinal  supplements, wax, resin, rope, cloth, pulp, paper, plastics, trash bags, Steel, rubber and fuel.
As told by African Slavers: Hemp and the African
7 The African Dagga Cultures
          Long before greed and ambition prompted the countries of Western Europe to send their armies to conquer the New World, Europeans were exploring and exploiting Africa.
         The incentives that beckoned the white race to the “dark continent” were many, but chief among them were precious goods such as gold, ivory, and spices. Once they began to colonize the New World, however, European interest focused on yet another African treasure—the slave.
          The growth of the plantation systems in both North and South America had created a sudden demand for cheap and obedient labor, and to meet this demand Europeans, again, looked to Africa.
          Africa was no stranger to the slave trade. Human bondage is one of man’s earliest atrocities. It was commonplace throughout the ancient and early medieval worlds. But until the coming of the Europeans, slav-ery had existed on only a relatively small scale.
          Once the people of Western Europe “discovered” the continent, however, slavery became big business. Approximately ten million native Africans were taken from their homes between the middle of the fifteenth to the end of the nineteenth century to destinations sometimes halfway around the world, to be dis-passionately sold like chattel.

Frustrated at not being able to buy cattle from these natives at a reasonable price, the Dutch immigrants brought their own cattle to the Cape Colony, along with farmers (Boers) to look after them. The coming of the Boers, it turned out, signaled the en-slavement of the Hottentots.

At first, the Dutch and the African got on fairly well together. But as more and more Boers came to the Cape Colony, more and more of the Hottentots’ land was expropriated, including their valuable grazing fields. The Boers were not merely content with robbing the Hottentots of their land, they also began raiding their herds.

The Hottentots offered only a token resistance. They were herders, not warriors; and their spears were no match for gunpowder. To preserve their precious cattle, many of the Hottentots moved further north into the interior. Those who tried to make a fight of it were either killed or taken prisoner and made to serve as domestic servants for the rest of their lives.

Despite his disapproval of the drug, Thompson says that the white landowners cultivated cannabis for their servants, even though its effects were not in the best interests of the whites. The reason for this anomaly, explains Thompson, was that the white man used dagga “as an inducement to retain the wild Bushmen in their service. whom they have made captives at an early age . “11

There were some whites such as evangelist Hugo Hahn who shared Thompson’s belief that continued use of dagga was not in the best interests of the natives. Hahn had come to Africa to save the souls of the savages.

Their use of dagga, Flahn felt, was a vile habit that would keep their souls from ever entering heaven. Not one to sit idly by while souls were at stake, Hahn raided Boer hemp farms, burning the wicked plants wherever he found them. His actions did little to endear him to either the natives or the white settlers of the area.12

Although he could not have cared less about the souls of the na-tives, another crusader who condemned the natives’ indulgence in dagga was the famous American journalist Henry M. Stanley, whose rendezvous with the English missionary, David Livingston in 1871 is immortalized in his terse greeting: “Mr. Livingston, I presume.”

Unlike the compassionate Livingston, Stanley had little regard for the African native whom he described as “wild as a colt, chafing, rest-less, ferociously impulsive, superstitiously timid, liable to furious dem-onstrations, suspicious and unreasonable. . .”13

Stanley was in fact totally prejudiced against the native African. Regarding the natives’ use of cannabis, which he believed weakened their bodies and made them unfit to carry his cumbrous cargo, he wrote:

Certainly most deleterious to the physical powers is the almost universal habit of vehemently inhaling the smoke of the Cannabis sativa or wild hemp. In a light atmosphere, such as we have in hot days in the Tropics, with the thermometer rising to 140 Fahr. in the sun, these people, with lungs and vitals injured by excessive indulgence in these destructive habits, discover they have no physical stamina to sustain them. The rigor of a march in a loaded caravan soon tells upon their weakened powers, and one by one they drop from the ranks, betraying their impotence and infirmaties.14

Apparently, the unwillingness of the natives to risk their lives and to break their backs so that Stanley could become famous was not due to dagga’s weakening of their spirits.

The change in attitude occurred shortly after 1843, when the Republic of Natalia (Natal), on the northeast coast of South Africa, was annexed by England and made a part of the Cape Colony. Following the development of the sugar industry in the new province, more and more laborers were needed to work the fields. When native manpower proved unequal to the task, workers were sought from other countries, especially from the British colony of India, and about 6000 mainly low-caste Indians entered the country.26

Although brought over expressly to work in the sugar fields, these “coolies,” as they were called, left the fields as soon as they were able to satisfy their indenture obligations and they sought jobs in other indus-tries. Many became semi-skilled laborers, domestic servants, farmers, storekeepers, fishermen, etc. But while they fitted into the European way of life, they never became a part of it. Their dark skins, culture, social and religious background, and language set them apart from both the Europeans and the native Africans.

         Europeans were also suspicious of them because of their use of cannabis, a habit which they brought with them from India. Cannabis, the Europeans believed, made the “coolies” sick and lazy and therefore unable to work, and also led them to commit criminal acts.
         The Indian emigrées had not had to import cannabis seeds with them; cannabis was already a popular among the natives and it was probably from them that the Indians obtained their cannabis. It was not long, however, before legal steps were adopted to curtail such usage.
         By 1870, European settlers became so alarmed at the alleged dangers of cannabis to South Africa that they passed a law “prohibiting the smoking use, or possession by the sale, barter, or gift to, any coolies what-soever, of any portion of the hemp plant (Cannabis sativa). .”27
         But just as identical laws in other countries had no effect on the use of cannabis, so too was it ignored in Africa. In 1887, the Wragg Commission (named after its chairman, Supreme Court Judge Walter Wragg) concluded that the “coolies” were still using cannabis and that the drug posed a danger to white South Africans. Again, measures were taken to outlaw the sale, cultivation, possession, and use of cannabis. Such laws were no more successful than previous ones.
          In 1923, South Africa tried to enlist the aid of the League of Nations in outlawing cannabis on an international scale, but to no avail. Five years later, the country passed yet another anti-cannabis law. This was followed by still more anti-cannabis laws.
          The result was always the same–try though they might to legislate cannabis out of existence, South African lawmakers were never a match for the plant’s tenacious hold over its devotees.
          The safflower and henna supplied the women with dyes for the stuffs which they manufactured from hemp and flax.