Irish Stereotypes for U.S. President Barack Obama; U.S. Vice-President Joe Biden

United States is a Racialized society, racial classification, and the concept of race is a part of the American culture, where it is frequently used in political contexts

has the highest death rates caused by firearms in the developed world

Barack Obama  Joe Biden

of Irish descent

Obama greets local residents on Main Street in Moneygall, Ireland, May 23, 2011.  U.S. President Barack Obama greets local residents on Main Street in Moneygall, Ireland, May 23, 2011.

U.S. President Barack Obama greets local residents on Main Street in Moneygall, Ireland, May 23, 2011.

44th President 2009–present: Some of his maternal ancestors came to America from a small village called Moneygall, in County Offaly.His ancestors lived in New England and the South and, by the 1800s, most were in the Midwest.

_________________________________________________________________________________

German-American Nationwide:According to the U.S. Census conducted in 2000, 42.8 million Americans German-American

15.2 of the total USA population 

_________________________________________________________________________________________

African Americans

in the United States

In 2013 US Census Bureau estimated

45,003,665 African Americans in the United States

14.1% of the total  USA population

__________________________________________________________________________________

Irish Americans

in the United States

reported Irish ancestry in the 2008  36.2 million Americans— Irish Americans

11.9% of the total population—

 

____________________________________________________________________________________

Stereotypes For Irish Americans

Irish Catholics were popular targets for stereotyping in the 19th century. According to historian George Potter, the media often stereotyped the Irish in America as being boss-controlled, violent (both among themselves and with those of other ethnic groups), voting illegally, prone to alcoholism and dependent on street gangs that were often violent or criminal. Potter quotes contemporary newspaper images

The difference between the Irish female “Bridget” and the Irish male “Pat” was distinct; while she was impulsive but fairly harmless, he was “always drunk, eternally fighting, lazy, and shiftless”. In contrast to the view that Irish women were shiftless, slovenly and stupid (like their male counterparts), girls were said to be “industrious, willing, cheerful, and honest—they work hard, and they are very strictly moral”.

race-white-irish-discriminatory-cartoon-1

Americans believed that Irish men, not women, were primarily responsible for any problems that arose in the family. Even Irish people themselves viewed Irish men as the cause of family disintegration whereas women were “pillars of strength” that could uplift their families out of poverty and into the middle class.In this sense, Irish women were similar to their American counterparts as mothers with moral authority.

There were also Darwinian-inspired excuses for the discrimination of the Irish in America. Many Americans believed that since the Irish were Celts and not Anglo-Saxons, they were racially inferior and deserved second-hand citizenship. The Irish being of inferior intelligence was a belief held by many Americans. This notion was held due to the fact that the Irish topped the charts demographically in terms of arrests and imprisonment. They also had more people confined to insane asylums and poorhouses than any other group. The racial supremacy belief that many Americans had at the time contributed significantly to Irish discrimination.

 Irish Americans 11.9% of the total population—reported Irish ancestry in the 2008

 

The states with the most Irish populations:

California- 2,573,023                 (6.9%)

New York- 2,509,092               (12.9%)
Pennsylvania- 2,207,704         (17.4%)
Florida- 1,897,126                     (10.1%)
Texas- 1,886,844                       (7.5%)
Ohio- 1,625,166                         (14.1%)
Illinois- 1,598,702                     (12.4%)
Massachusetts- 1,521,511         (23.2%)
New Jersey- 1,335,209             (15.2%)
Michigan- 1,151,178                   (11.7%)
North Carolina- 869,820          (9.1%)
Missouri- 830,534                     (13.9%)
Virginia- 804,331                      (10.0%)
Georgia- 803,004                       (8.3%)
Indiana- 788,683                       (12.2%)
Washington- 785,664                (11.6%)
Tennessee- 707,732                    (11.1%)
Maryland- 683,240                    (11.8%)
Wisconsin- 651,840                    (11.5%)
Arizona- 624,091                          (9.7%)
Colorado- 613,526                       (12.2%)
Connecticut- 595,804                 (16.7%)
Minnesota- 582,386                    (11.0%)
Kentucky- 556,305                       (12.8%)

 

The states with the top percentages of Irish:

Massachusetts                        (23.2%)

New Hampshire                      (21.5%)
Rhode Island                           (19.2%)
Delaware                                   (18.1%)
Maine, Vermont                      (17.5%)
Pennsylvania                            (17.4%)
Connecticut                               (16.7%)
Montana, New Jersey            (15.2%)
Iowa                                           (14.9%)
West Virginia                           (14.4%)
Ohio                                            (14.1%)
Nebraska                                    (14.0%)
Missouri                                     (13.9%)
Wyoming                                    (13.4%)
New York                                     (12.9%)
Kansas, Kentucky                       (12.8%)
Oklahoma, Oregon                    (12.6%)
Arkansas                                      (12.5%)
Illinois                                          (12.4%)
Colorado, Indiana                      (12.2%)
Maryland                                     (11.8%)
Michigan                                      (11.7%)
Washington                                 (11.6%)
Wisconsin                                    (11.5%)
Tennessee                                     (11.1%)
Alaska, Minnesota                       (11.0%)
South Dakota                               (10.3%)
Florida                                           (10.1%)
Virginia                                         (10.0%)
New Mexico-       147,030           (7,15%, first ancestry)

 

After the large influx of Irish in the middle of the 19th century, many Catholic children were being educated in public schools. While officially nondenominational, the King James Version of the Bible was widely used in the classroom across the country, which Catholics were forbidden to read.[121] Many Irish children complained that Catholicism was openly mocked in the classroom. In New York City, the curriculum vividly portrayed Catholics, and specifically the Irish, as villainous.

Many Irish work gangs were hired by contractors to build canals, railroads, city streets and sewers across the country.[21] In the South, they underbid slave labor.[124] One result was that small cities that served as railroad centers came to have large Irish populations.[125]

In 1895, the Knights of Equity was founded, to combat discrimination against Irish Catholics in the U.S., and to assist them financially when needed.

Irish Americans (Irish: Gael-Mheiriceánaigh) are Americans who can trace their ancestry to the island of Ireland.

About 36.2 million Americans— Irish Americans 11.9% of the total population—reported Irish ancestry in the 2008

________________________________________________________________________ 

German-American Nationwide:   15.2

North Dakota              46.8

Wisconsin                      43.9

South Dakota                44.5
Nebraska                       42.7
Minnesota                     38.4
Iowa                               35.7
Montana                       27.0
Ohio                               26.5
Wyoming                      25.9
Kansas                          25.8
Pennsylvania               25.4
Missouri                       23.5
Indiana                         22.6
Colorado                      22.0
Oregon                         20.5
Michigan                     20.4
Illinois                          19.6
Idaho                            18.8
Washington                18.8
Maryland                     15.7
Arizona                        15.6
Delaware                     14.3
Alaska                          14.2
Nevada                         14.1
West Virginia              14.0
Kentucky                     12.7
Oklahoma                   12.6
New Jersey                 12.6
Florida                         11.8
Virginia                       11.7
Utah                             11.5
New York                    11.2
Texas                            9.9
California                    9.8
Connecticut                9.8
New Mexico                9.8
North Carolina           9.5
Arkansas                      9.3
Vermont                       9.1
New Hampshire          8.6
Maine                            8.6
South Carolina            8.4
Tennessee                    8.3
Georgia                         7.0
Louisiana                     7.0
Massachusetts            5.9
Hawaii                         5.8
Alabama                      5.7
Rhode Island              5.7   (first ancestry)
District of

Columbia                   4.8
Mississippi                4.5

 

German-American Nationwide: 15.2

a stereotyped Jew conspires behind the scenes to control the Allied powers, represented by the British, American, and Soviet flags.

a stereotyped Jew conspires behind the scenes to control the Allied powers, represented by the British, American, and Soviet flags.

Nazi propaganda played a crucial role in selling the myth of the “national community” to Germans who longed for unity, national pride and greatness, and a break with the rigid social stratification of the past. But a second, more sinister aspect of the Nazi myth was that not all Germans were welcome in the new community. Propaganda helped to define who would be excluded from the new society and justified measures against the “outsiders”: Jews, Sinti and Roma (Gypsies), homosexuals, political dissidents, and Germans viewed as genetically inferior and harmful to “national health” (people with mental illness and intellectual or physical disabilities, epileptics, congenitally deaf and blind persons, chronic alcoholics, drug users, and others).

The laws affected some 450,000 “full Jews” (defined as those with four Jewish grandparents and belonging to the Jewish religion), and 250,000 others (including converted Jews and Mischlinge, those with some Jewish parentage), altogether slightly more than one percent of the German population. For months before the announcement of the “Nuremberg Laws,” the Nazi Party press aggressively incited Germans against racial pollution, with the presence of Jews in public swimming pools becoming a major theme.

 ________________________________________

African Americans in the United States

 

In 2013 US Census Bureau estimated 45,003,665 African Americans in the United States meaning that

14.1% of the total

African-American USA population of

 

Year Number % of total
population % Change
(10 yr) Slaves % in slavery
1790 757,208              19.3% (highest) –                     697,681 92%

1800 1,002,037 1       8.9%                  32.3%                   893,602 89%
1810 1,377,808          19.0%                  37.5%                 1,191,362 86%
1820 1,771,656          18.4%                  28.6%               1,538,022 87%
1830 2,328,642        18.1%                   31.4%                2,009,043 86%
1840 2,873,648         16.8%                 23.4%                2,487,355 87%
1850 3,638,808        15.7%                  26.6%                  3,204,287 88%
1860 4,441,830        14.1%                    22.1%                  3,953,731 89%
1870 4,880,009       12.7%                     9.9% – –
1880 6,580,793        13.1%                    34.9% – –
1890 7,488,788       11.9%                     13.8% – –
1900 8,833,994       11.6%                     18.0% – –
1910 9,827,763        10.7%                     11.2% – –
1920 10.5 million     9.9%                      6.8% – –

1930 11.9 million                  9.7%                        9.7%

1940 12.9 million                  9.8%                     8.4% – –

1930 11.9 million                  9.7% (lowest) 13% – –

1940 12.9 million                  9.8%                     8.4% – –

1950 15.0 million                 10.0%                   16% – –
1960 18.9 million                10.5%                   26% – –
1970 22.6 million                11.1%                    20% – –
1980 26.5 million                11.7%                    17% – –
1990 30.0 million                12.1%                    13% – –
2000 34.6 million               12.3%                    15% – –
2010 38.9 million                12.6%                    12% – –

When Los Angeles was first established in 1781, of the 46 original settlers 26 were black or mulatto, meaning a mixture of African and Spanish origins. Blacks and mulattoes did not face legal discriminations until a period after the handover to the United States in 1848, when white southerners coming to California during the Gold Rush brought racist attitudes with them. 12 black people were registered as residents of Los Angeles in 1850. Because many blacks were enslaved, until abolition in 1865, few blacks migrated to Los Angeles. Due to the construction of the Santa Fe Railroad and a settlement increase in 1880, increasing numbers of blacks came to Los Angeles. 2,131 African Americans, the second largest black population in California, lived in Los Angeles by 1900.[1]

By 2010 census results

African Americans as percentage of local population, 2000.

African American population

density in the United States, 2000.
Rank State African-American Along

Population  %

African-American
1 Mississippi                     1,074,200                                   37.30%
2 Louisiana                       1,452,396                                       31.98%
3 Georgia                          2,950,435                                       30.02%
4 Maryland                       1,700,298                                       29.44%
5 South Carolina              1,290,684                                      28.48%
6 Alabama                         1,251,311                                        26.38%
7 North Carolina              2,048,628                                      21.60%
8 Delaware                         191,814                                           20.95%
9 Virginia                            1,551,399                                       19.91%
10 Tennessee                      1,055,689                                     16.78%
11 Florida                            2,999,862                                      15.91%
12 Arkansas                           449,895                                        15.76%
13 New York                       3,073,800                                       15.18%
14 Illinois                             1,866,414                                        14.88%
15 New Jersey                     1,204,826                                        14.46%
16 Michigan                         1,400,362                                        14.24%
17 Ohio                                 1,407,681                                         12.04%
18 Texas                              2,979,598                                         11.91%
19 Missouri                           704,043                                         11.49%
20 Pennsylvania                   1,377,689                                    10.79%
21 Connecticut                       362,296                                    10.34%
22 Indiana                               591,397                                     9.07%
23 Nevada                                  218,626                                  8.10%
24 Oklahoma                               277,644                                 7.96%
25 Kentucky                                  337,520                                7.71%
26 Massachusetts                          434,398                                  7.02%
27 California                                 2,299,072                                  6.67%
28 Rhode Island                                60,189                                    6.36%
29 Kansas                                         167,864                                    6.15%
30 Wisconsin                                 359,148                                     6.07%
31 Minnesota                                  274,412                                    4.57%
32 Nebraska                                       82,885                                   4.50%
33 Colorado                                      201,737                                 4.28%
34 Alaska                                            23,263                                4.27%
35 Arizona                                       259,008                                4.16%
36 Washington                               240,042                                 3.74%
37 West Virginia                               63,124                                  3.58%
38 Hawaii                                           21,424                                  3.08%
39 New Mexico                                  42,550                                  2.97%
40 Iowa                                                89,148                                   2.68%
41 Oregon                                           69,206                                     2.01%
42 Wyoming                                         4,748                                     1.29%
43 Utah                                                   29,287                                   1.27%
44 New Hampshire                                15,035                                      1.22%
45 South Dakota                                   10,207                                        1.14%
46 North Dakota                                    7,960                                        1.08%
47 Maine                                                15,707                                       1.03%
48 Idaho                                                9,810                                       0.95%
49 Vermont                                           6,277                                     0.87%
50 Montana                                          4,027                                   0.67%

14.1% of the total

African-American USA population of

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