Us prison industry takes world by storm

The work is done by Unicor, previously known as Federal Prison Industries. It’s a government-owned corporation, established during the Depression, that employs about 20,000 inmates in 70 prisons to make everything from clothing to office furniture to solar panels to military electronics.

One of the company’s high-tech specialties: Patriot missile parts. “UNICOR/FPI supplies numerous electronic components and services for guided missiles, including the Patriot Advanced Capability (PAC-3) missile,” Unicor’s website explains. “We assemble and distribute the Intermediate Frequency Processor (IFP) for the PAC-3s seeker. The IFP receives and filters radio-frequency signals that guide the missile toward its target.”

The missiles are then marketed worldwide — sometimes by Washington’s top officials. Last year, Secretary of Defense Robert Gates pitched the Patriots to the Turkish government last year, a diplomatic cable released by WikiLeaks reveals: “SecDef stressed that ‘nothing can compete with the PAC-3 when it comes to capabilities.’”

Patriot assemblers Raytheon and Lockheed Martin aren’t the only defense contractors relying on prison help. As Rohrlich notes, Unicor “inmates also make cable assemblies for the McDonnell Douglas/Boeing F-15, the General Dynamics/Lockheed Martin F-16, Bell/Textron’s Cobra helicopter, as well as electro-optical equipment for the BAE Systems Bradley Fighting Vehicle’s laser rangefinder.”

Unicor used to make helmets for the military, as well. But that work was suspended when 44,000 helmets were recalled for shoddy quality.

Government agencies — with the exception of the Defense Department and the CIA — are required to buy goods from Unicor, according to a Congressional Research Service report (.pdf). And no wonder: the labor costs are bordering on zero. “Inmates earn from $0.23 per hour up to a maximum of $1.15 per hour, depending on their proficiency and educational level, among other things,” the report notes.

Last year, Unicor grossed $772 million, according to its most recent financial report (.pdf). Traditionally, inmate salaries make up about five percent of that total.

Unicor insists that the deal is a good one for inmates — and for the government. The manufacturing work offers a chance for job training, which “improves the likelihood that inmates will remain crime-free upon their release,” the company says in its report. (Some reports suggest that Unicor prisoners are as much as 24% less likely to return to crime.)

The work also keeps the inmates in check, Unicor insists. “In the face of an escalating inmate population and an increasing percentage of inmates with histories of violence, FPI’s programs have helped ease tension and avert volatile situations,

thereby protecting lives and federal property,” the company says. “Prisons without meaningful activities for inmates are dangerous prisons, and dangerous prisons are expensive prisons.”

children will lose out on good healthcare or treatment

Testing New Drugs on the World’s Poorest Patients, up to 80% of patients recruited in some developing countries are not informed about the nature of the study they are taking part in. In addition, many of them do not feel free to quit the trial, because they think that they or their children will lose out on good healthcare or treatment if they abandon it.

Africans, Africans, Look at our skin-Somalia

“Ellen Johnson Sirleaf (president of Liberia)

“We are not a commodity in the hands of bankers and politicians”; “They do not represent us”; “If you won’t let us dream, we will not let you sleep”; “No hay pan para tanto chorizo.” (“There’s not enough bread for so much sausage”: a pun on the double meaning of chorizo, which means both “sausage” and “crook.”) Weed HIP HOP #HIPHOP JAY Z Kentucky/Liberia  hemp market  

Liberia Observes World Water Day

Violence erupts in Liberia as police fire on crowds trying to escape from quarantined Ebola zones 

blaming the civilians for the fact one of his own soldiers shot this poor child.

There is a case for challenging borders that were drawn up by European imperialists and which continue to inhibit travel and trade.

What has happen to the Country Somalia-Divide to conquer Colonialism

Africans, Africans. Look at our skin.
“That’s our continent, we belong to one continent. We may, by virtue of history, have been
divided by certain boundaries and especially by colonialism. But our founding fathers in 1963
showed us the way and we must take up that teaching that we got in 1963. That we are one and we must be united.”

 

Oh wait! Silly me, the D.E.A. seems to believe pain reduction is not a worthwhile reason for doctors to prescribe opiate based drugs even to dying Americans in hospice centers. Why would I imagine they would care about Africans, some of who might survive and face addiction issues. Sorry, I’m so tired, stressed out, and disturbed by the non-newsworthy ongoing humanitarian disaster in Western Africa it is throwing me off my “game.”XXX

Dr Liu described encounter six pregnant women walking the streets unable to find anyone help them deliver apparently in part do to the few remaining health officials around not wanting to risk an agonizing death of Ebola from encountering patient blood with no available protective gloves and other personal protective equipment. XXXX